All Posts in Category: Mental Health

Holistic Bliss Article: Is your gut smarter than your brain? October edition

Is your gut smarter than your brain?

Featured in the October 2018 edition of Holistic Bliss Magazine

Authors: Kate Mason and Suzi Le Fanue

Gut decision may seem reckless and impulsive but did you know you have more neurons in your gut than in your brain?

The gut brain connection is the communication between your digestive tract and the central nervous system.  This is known as the gut-brain axis which enables your gastrointestinal tract to send and receive signals to and from your brain.  The foods we eat and absorb translates to how we feel, think and act.

Our digestive system contains a large community of microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses and fungi known as the gut microbiome. This microbiome is the key mediator between the gut and the brain.  These organisms feed on nutrients from foods we consume and produce compounds in the body that can affect the way we feel and function.

Neurotransmitters are chemicals and they are made from protein and nutrients we absorb from our diet.  If your diet is lacking sufficient protein and nutrient dense foods you may find yourself feeling more anxious, depressed, tired and unable to sleep deeply.

Approximately 95% of the body’s serotonin (our happy neurotransmitter) is produced by our gut microbiome. So when digestive bacterial balance is disrupted, a condition termed dysbiosis, you may be more prone to conditions associated with imbalanced happy chemicals such as anxiety, low mood, low energy and depression.  

Another factor that can affect the brain-gut connection is SIBO, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. It is an extremely common digestive imbalance, however, is rarely investigated or diagnosed.

The digestive tract contains over one kilogram of microscopic bacteria, usually made up of good bacteria such as lactobacillus and bifidobacteria and other bacteria that don’t provide benefit and/or cause harm, bad bacteria.

SIBO occurs when there is an overgrowth of BAD bacteria in the small intestine. This overgrowth means that before the villi can release enzymes to break down food, the bacteria will feed off the food you are consuming and cause it to ferment.

Do you have gas and bloating after meals? Cramping, diarrhoea or constipation?  This could be SIBO.

SIBO causes the release of gases, such as hydrogen and methane, which cause the IBS like symptoms of SIBO. These gases also cause damage to the fragile villi on the gut lining meaning that nutrient absorption is compromised, which after a period of time may exacerbate hormonal balance, neurological issues, fatigue and sleep problems.  

Many cases of IBS are actually cases of SIBO or both, they produce similar symptoms.

A breath test is a simple, non-invasive, and extremely accurate test that detects bacterial overgrowth in the small intestine.

We mustn’t forget the importance of addressing your mental wellbeing when working correcting gut imbalance. An imbalance in stress hormones such as cortisol is known to affect gut function and nutrient absorption.  

Essentially, it’s important to address both the gut and the brain when looking to correct an imbalance of either mental or digestive health as they both affect each other.

Kate Mason & Suzi Le Fanue Naturopaths at Integrated Wellness Clinic

www.integratedwellnessclinic.com.au

 

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Are you suffering with Adrenal Fatigue?

Adrenal fatigue Sunshine Coast

Adrenal fatigue with our Sunshine Coast & Brisbane Naturopath

Are you just tired or do you have adrenal fatigue?  

The common statements I hear range from “I am just so tired all the time, but I cant sleep” to “I just cant be bothered its all too hard”. Should you just sleep more, de-stress and take a vitamin B?

It is really a lot deeper than this most of the time.

Have you heard of adrenal fatigue? It can strike anyone, even if on the exterior they appear physically healthy and like they are totally composed.

Many question whether or not adrenal fatigue really exists. So this often makes it hard for those to know if they have it or not. Those with adrenal fatigue will often visit their doctor many times and feel as though many questions are left unanswered.

What sort of symptoms would you display if you had adrenal fatigue? The biggest one is obviously excessive fatigue. This may be accompanied with poor immunity, feeling run down, changes in blood pressure, difficultly waking up in the morning, low libido, mental fogginess, poor memory and irritability, particularly when overwhelmed. You will generally feel like it doesn’t matter how much you sleep, you will still be tired!

How does this happen? The biggest cause is long term stress and essentially burnt out. Our body is only suppose to be put into a stress response for a very short period of time. If on a day to day basis we are continually stressed, busy or overwhelmed the body keeps on producing massive amounts of the stress hormones from the adrenal glands. With time they fatigue and the production of the hormone, cortisol, reduces.

The big question is, what do you do if you have adrenal fatigue? These are just a few of the simple changes you could implement.

Reduce carbohydrates and remove refined sugar. Generally our diets sit too heavy towards carbohydrate. When you eat refined sugar, processed or simple carbohydrates your body releases insulin. This hormone causes your blood sugar levels to peak and then drop. Those with adrenal fatigue are usually more sensitive to these peaks and troughs.

I tend to recommend keeping carbohydrate to a low-moderate level (never very low) and making sure there is protein at each meal and at least 3 cups of low starch vegies to help balance your blood sugar levels. Getting your carbohydrates from sources like quinoa, sweet potato and pumpkin are generally better sources than the grainy types.

Eat smaller portions. You may also benefit from eating 6 smaller meals over the day rather than 3 big meals to help balance your blood sugar levels. And reduce the heaviness of food as the day goes on, to assist in the digestion of your food. A stressed gut can impact the adrenal glands.

Increase the vegies. Ensure you are eating plenty of colourful vegies and high antioxidant fruits in your diet. Fantastic fruit examples include berries and kiwi fruit. I always say your shopping basket should look like the rainbow. Of course, only natural colours!

Cut out the caffeine. Your morning coffee may feel like it is giving you a boost, but that is very short lived. It is adding pressure onto your adrenals and over the long term can contribute to fatigue. It may seem like it isn’t important to cut out, but if you do have any form of fatigue it is an important factor to address.

Add in some gut boosting goodness! Bone broth is incredible. It contains an abundance of anti-inflammatory, immune boosting and gut healing nutrients. You can use it as either a base for soups and cassoroles or sip as a hot drink.

Brew some tea. A combination of licorice and Siberian ginseng is a blend that comes to mind. A tasty combination and great for a subtle pick up.

So if you are presenting with these sorts of symptoms I always recommend requesting to have your adrenals and the nutrients essential for adrenal function tested with both the assistance of your GP and Naturopath. We generally prefer the hormone cortisol to be measured over the day and not just a single sample to see where your adrenals function at their highest and lowest. Following this a plan can then be customized based on those results and your presenting symptoms.

Author: Suzi Le Fanue

 www.integratedwellnessclinic.com.au

No matter where you are, we can offer naturopath consultation by phone or skype consultations and nutritional supplementation through Australia and Overseas. Alternatively, we would love to see you in person in our Brisbane Naturopath or either of our Buderim Naturopath or Caloundra Naturopath Clinic on the Sunshine Coast.

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How well do you handle stress?

How Well Do You Handle Stress?
Living in this day and age, stress is a normal part of modern life. You will be exposed to some sort of stress every day, whether it’s waking up to an alarm, sitting in traffic, paying bills, working, meeting deadlines – all of these can take their toll. Thankfully, the body has an amazing, protective stress response system to help you cope. The stress response was historically designed to kick in to save your life; nowadays, your stress response is being activated every day rather than just when you come into contact with a sabre tooth tiger! However, this ongoing activation by your nervous system can lead to symptoms of stress and mood disorders that are becoming increasingly common.

Recognising the Signs of Stress 
Depending on the type of stress and how long you have been experiencing it, you may be familiar with some of these signs and symptoms.

Signs of acute stress – Muscle tension, Increased heart rate, Sweating, Energy fluctuations, Alertness, Sleep disturbances

Signs of ongoing stress – Fatigue, Sleep disturbances, Worrying, Sadness, Irritability, Poor concentration, Weight loss or gain
Getting the Right Tools 

When you are under stress, your overworked stress response system requires even more nutrients than usual. This is because your body needs vitamins and minerals to produce the hormones and neurotransmitters (the brain’s messengers) required to adapt to the stress and bring the body back into balance.

  • B group vitamins: B vitamins are needed for healthy mood, motivation and wellbeing. They are vital for producing energy, as well as the neurotransmitters that promote happiness, relaxation and sleep.
  • Magnesium: When you are stressed, your body may require more magnesium than normal. Magnesium can be beneficial for many things including managing stress and improving energy. You may also know that magnesium is used as a muscle relaxant. Due to its relaxing qualities, it may improve mood and sleep.
  • Taurine and glutamine: These amino acids are required as building blocks for your neurotransmitters. They can also help to calm the nervous system, as well as protect against the damage that stress can cause.

Setting Up the Foundations 
Now that you know which nutrients can be great for use in times of stress, eating a nutritious diet can help you to maintain the health of your nerves long-term. What happens to your diet when you’re stressed? Do you eat a lot, or do you make poor food choices when short on time or patience?

  • During times of stress, sugars and refined carbohydrates are a no no! While they provide quick energy, they do not fuel your body with nutrients it needs to cope with stress, and can ultimately lead to weight gain.
  • Protein from fish, lean meats, eggs, legumes and nuts can provide you with amino acids to fuel your brain whilst sustaining you for longer, minimising those stress cravings.
  • Fish, in particular, contains both protein and essential fats, otherwise known as omega-3 fatty acids which can support a healthy stress response and healthy mood.

Be Strong Against Stress! 
If you are interested in strengthening your mind and body to become more resilient to the effects of everyday stress, book in to see one of our knowledgable and friendly Naturopaths and/or Nutritionists.

Our Naturopaths would love to help you! Book online or phone  (07) 5458 4800 to book your free assessment consultation.

 

Where to next?

Book your FREE Naturopathic Assessment Consultation to get you started. Consultations start at $57. 

We use the ‘Healthpoint‘ health fund rebate system in the clinic our accredited Naturopaths have current health fund provider status. This means if you bring your card to the consultation you can usually claim your rebate on the spot using our Healthpoint terminal, and only pay the gap on your consultation. This helps you see your health fund benefit sooner.

No matter where you are, we can offer naturopath consultation by phone or skype consultations and nutritional supplementation through Australia and Overseas. Alternatively, we would love to see you in person in our Brisbane or Gold Coast Clinic either or Buderim Naturopath or Caloundra Naturopath Clinic on the Sunshine Coast.

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Stop procrastinating. Boost Dopamine and achieve your goals!

Dopamine motivation with our Sunshine Coast NaturopathsAre you physically motivated enough to reach your goals?

This time of the year we will all start to think about what we want out of 2017. For some of you your health may be at the top of the list. Too often we set these goals and we don’t achieve them. We say I will start the diet on Monday, I will pay the credit card next month, take the dog for a walk tomorrow, empty the cupboard next week. Goals are usually not achieved because we procrastinate.

What if there was a hormone that we had in our body that kept you motivated, goal orientated and focused?
Well, this hormone actually exists – it is called dopamine!

Dopamine is often referred to as the “feel good” chemical. When it is low the person is more likely to feel depressed, lack pleasure, be unmotivated or lethargic. Those with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) usually lack dopamine. Most people have heard of serotonin because many anti-depressants work on serotonin, but many have not heard of dopamine even though it is critical in clarity, happiness, focus and wellbeing.

So how can you increase dopamine levels naturally?

Are you suffering with digestive problem? It is critical that your gut is healthy, as all good health starts in the gut. Your stomach is the beginning of protein digestion, where protein is broken down into amino acids. To make dopamine your body needs plenty of the amino acid tyrosine. If you have reflux, bloating, food sensitivities or indigestion it may mean that you are not digesting your proteins efficiently. So digestive dysfunction needs to be addressed.

Dopamine is made from protein and a cocktail of other important nutrients like vitamin C, iron, magnesium, B vitamins and zinc. It is also wise to consider increasing foods high in tyrosine such as almonds, avocado, bananas and poultry. You need to make sure your diet has plenty of colour too. If any of the dopamine cofactors from the diet are missing it makes it very difficult for the body to produce dopamine.

A study published in 2008 in the Journal of Nutrition & Metabolism demonstrated that low dopamine levels are associated with an inability to control portion sizes, so you are more likely to overeat. So if your goal is to shed some weight we need to get those dopamine levels up!

So how do you know if you are low in dopamine? There are clinical pathology tests as simple as a urine test that can determine your neurotransmitter levels.

If you know you procrastinate and put your goals on hold, you may be in need of more dopamine!

 

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Bring back your mojo!

get-your-mojo-back

Bring back your mojo! – By Naturopaths Suzi Le Fanue and Ellen Tattam 🙂

 

If you asked any of our Naturopaths who we see the most in clinic, it is women who are burnt out, stressed and overwhelmed.
Why is that? Women’s lifestyles are becoming increasingly busier, leaving less and less time for self care.
Naturopaths see women of all ages in clinic every day, who put their children, family, work and many other commitments before their own health, without even realising it.


Poor dietary choices may be the start of the cascade of events that happens in this typical picture.
Choosing processed foods with minimal nutrients, because it’s fast and easy, is a common choice made my Mum’s on-the-go and this can easily be corrected with the right nutrition advice, planning and dietary tips.

Choosing foods high in good proteins and fats that keep blood sugar levels stabilised, without dips and spikes, is important for energy levels and mood changes.

 

On a biochemical level, when a perceived threat is encountered a fight-or-flight response is engaged.
For example, in times of stress an alarm system is set off in a part of your brain, the hypothalamus.
In turn this prompts your adrenal glands, located atop your kidneys, to release a surge of adrenaline and cortisol,
two hormones affected by stress. While adrenaline increases your heart rate, elevates blood pressure and
increases energy supplies – cortisol, being the primary stress hormone, increases glucose in the bloodstream and increases the availability of substances that repair tissues.
However, cortisol can alternatively alter immune system responses and suppress the digestive system, reproductive system and growth processes.

 

What happens with time is the body can start depleting its production of cortisol. You may then starts to feel tired (especially in the morning), stressed, overwhelmed, irritable, emotional and like you have lost your spark or zest. Adrenal insufficiency or adrenal fatigue is a biochemical imbalance we see frequently in clinic.

 

So could you do to address either adrenal overdrive or adrenal insufficiency?

You could look into addressing your nutrient status, ensure your diet is geared towards balancing blood sugar levels (adequate protein, moderate low GI carbohydrates) as well as look into herbal medicine to support the adrenals. An important recommendation is to eliminate caffeine from your diet. As caffeine can cause disturbed sleeping patterns, and reduces sleep quality. Sugar can also increase poor quality sleep, particularly if consumed at night.

 

A key neurotransmitter that is affected by stress is serotonin. Most people relate serotonin as the happy neurotransmitter in the brain but it is much more than that. Serotonin is also vital for regulating your sleeping patterns, body temperature, memory and appetite. Therefore, when stress causes imbalances with these chemicals around the body, it can lead to sleep disturbances, appetite and digestive function problems as well as many other hormonal imbalances.

 

 

Our top lifestyle recommendations:

-Dedicate “me time”. This could be reading a new book, gardening, walking the dog, booking in a massage or some form of pampering, taking a long bath, or engaging in gentle exercise. Plan these ahead of time, and dont leave it until the last minute.

-Be careful who you surround yourself with. Please can either lift your energy or they can drain it. Your thoughts have the power to alter your psychology which can then alter your physiology.

-Avoid night time television and staying up late. This depletes melatonin, your sleep hormone.
As Naturopaths, we recommend a balanced and holistic combination of a nutrient dense diet, regular exercise and self care. Look after yourself and the mojo will follow!

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Probiotics & Prebiotics Neuropsychological Conditions

Probiotics and Prebiotics Influence Neuropsychological Conditions – 6 Surprising Facts About Microbes In Your Gut

gutbrainaxisdmicro

Researchers have long suggested a link between the gut-brain axis and neuropsychiatric disorders such asautism, depression, and eating disorders. Using probiotics and prebiotics to alter the gut microbiota and influence the gut-brain axis may open up new ways of influencing neuropsychological conditions, says a new review.

The majority of the science for probiotics has focused on gut health, but as the understanding of the gut and the microbiome increases, probiotics are increasing linked to a range of beneficial effects, from weight management to immune support and allergy response, and from oral health to cholesterol reduction.

The gut contains microorganisms that share a structural similarity with the neuropeptides involved in regulating behavior, mood, and emotion–a phenomenon known as molecular mimicry.

At the “forefront of current research” is work on the gut-brain axis – the two direction communication between the gut microbiota and the brain. Data from rodent studies has indicated that modification of the gut microbiota can alter signaling mechanisms, emotional behavior, and instinctive reflexes.

Researchers have long postulated that gut bacteria influence brain function. A century ago, Russian embryologist Elie Metchnikoff surmised that a healthy colonic microbial community could help combat senility and that the friendly bacterial strains found in sour milk and yogurt Website Designing Company in Goa would increase a person’s longevity.

Researchers have shown that under certain conditions, some types of normal gut bacteria can trigger disease. Sarkis Mazmanian, a microbiologist at the California Institute of Technology, dubbed these elements “pathobionts”; the term “pathogens,” in contrast, refers to opportunistic microbes that are not normally part of the gut microbial community.

Communication

According to a new review in Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment by Linghong Zhou and Jane Foster from McMaster University in Canada, communication channels between the gut and the brain include sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves and the enteric nervous system (ENS).

“The role of the sympathetic nervous system in the gut-brain axis includes regulating motility, blood flow, barrier function, and immune system activation,” they said. “Bidirectional communication via the vagus nerve, a component of the parasympathetic nervous system, is a well-established pathway for gut-brain signaling and, in recent years, has emerged as an important microbiota to brain communication pathway.

“The ENS, sometimes referred to as “the second brain” comprises intrinsic primary afferent neurons, motor neurons, and glial cells contained within the myenteric plexus and the submucosal plexus that extends along the entire length of the gut. The ENS plays an essential role in normal intestinal function including motility and secretion.”

Gut-brain axis

The body can’t tell the difference between the structure of these mimics and its own cells, so antibodies could end up attacking both, potentially altering the physiology of the gut-brain axis.

The bacteria present in the gut affects the communication between belly and brain, they said, and the lack of healthy gut microbiota lead to dysfunction in the gut-brain axis, which in turn may lead to neuropsychological, metabolic, and gastrointestinal disorders.

Intervention trials with select strains of probiotics have revealed that supplementation may influence mood (Lactobacillus casei Shirota), and anxiety and depression (L. helveticus and B. longum).

There is also some data to support an effect with prebiotics, with improvements in stress hormone levels and attention in health volunteers taking oligosaccharides.

Neuropsychological disorders

The role of the gut microbiota in the development of neuropsychological disorders is also a focus for many researchers around the world, with data supporting an association between dysbiosis (microbial imbalance) in the gut and disorders including depression and autism spectrum disorder, metabolic disorders such as obesity, and gastrointestinal disorders including IBD and IBS.

“Fortunately, studies have also indicated that gut microbiota may be modulated with the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and fecal microbiota transplants as a prospect for therapy in microbiota-associated diseases,” wrote Zhou and Foster. “This modulation of gut microbiota is currently a growing area of research as it just might hold the key to treatment.”

The Power of Probiotics

Probiotics offset other intestinal bacteria that produce putrefactive and carcinogenic toxins. If harmful bacteria dominate the intestines, essential vitamins and enzymes are not produced and the level of harmful substances rises leading to cancer, liver and kidney disease, hypertension, arteriosclerosis and abnormal immunity. Harmful bacteria can proliferate under many different circumstances including peristalsis disorders, surgical operations of the stomach or small intestine, liver or kidney diseases, pernicious anaemia, cancer, radiation or antibiotic therapies, chemotherapy, immune disorders, emotional stress, poor diets and aging

The best known of the probiotics are the Lactobacilli, a number of species of which (acidophilus, bulgaricus, casei and sporogenes) reside in the human intestine in a symbiotic relationship with each other and with other microorganisms (the friendly Streptococci, E. coli and Bifidobacteria). Lactobacilli are essential for maintaining gut microfloral health, but the overall balance of the various microorganisms in the gut is what is most important.

Another probiotic which has recently generated a great deal of interest is the friendly yeast known as Saccharomyces boulardii, an organism that belongs to the Brewer’s Yeast family, not the Candida albicans group. S. boulardii is not a permanent resident of the intestine but, taken orally, it produces lactic acid and some B vitamins, and has an overall immune enhancing effect. In fact, it has been used therapeutically to fight candida infections.

6 SURPRISING FACTS ABOUT MICROBES IN YOUR GUT

1. What’s in Your Gut May Affect the Size of Your Gut
Need to lose weight? Why not try a gut bacteria transplant?New research published in the journal Sciencesuggests that the microbes in your gut may play a role in obesity.

2. Probiotics May Treat Anxiety and Depression
Scientists have been exploring the connection between gut bacteria and chemicals in the brain for years. New research adds more weight to the theory that researchers call “the microbiome–gut–brain axis.”Research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science shows that mice fed the bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus showed fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression. Researchers theorize that this is because L. rhamnosus acts on the central gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system, which helps regulate emotional behavior.

L. rhamnosus, which is available as a commercial probiotic supplement, has also been linked to the prevention of diarrhea, atopic dermatitis, and respiratory tract infections.

3. The More Bacteria the Better
While bacteria on the outside of your body can cause serious infections, the bacteria inside your body can protect against it. Studies have shown that animals without gut bacteria are more susceptible to serious infections.Bacteria found naturally inside your gut have a protective barrier effect against other living organisms that enter your body. They help the body prevent harmful bacteria from rapidly growing in your stomach, which could spell disaster for your bowels.

To do this, they develop a give-and-take relationship with your body.

“The host actively provides a nutrient that the bacterium needs, and the bacterium actively indicates how much it needs to the host,” according to research published in The Lancet.

4. Gut Bacteria Pass from Mother to Child in Breast Milk
It’s common knowledge that a mother’s milk can help beef up a baby’s immune system. New research indicates that the protective effects of gut bacteria can be transferred from mother to baby during breastfeeding.Work published in Environmental Microbiology shows that important gut bacteria travels from mother to child through breast milk to colonize a child’s own gut, helping his or her immune system to mature.

5. Lack of Gut Diversity Is Linked to Allergies
Too few bacteria in the gut can throw the immune system off balance and make it go haywire with hay fever.Researchers in Copenhagen reviewed the medical records and stool samples of 411 infants. They found that those who didn’t have diverse colonies of gut bacteria were more likely to develop allergies.

But before you throw your gut bacteria a proliferation party, know that they aren’t always beneficial.

6. Gut Bacteria Can Hurt Your Liver
Your liver gets 70 percent of its blood flow from your intestines, so it’s natural they would share more than just oxygenated blood.Italian researchers found that between 20 and 75 percent of patients with chronic fatty liver disease–the kind not associated with alcoholism–also had an overgrowth of gut bacteria. Some believe that the transfer of gut bacteria to the liver could be responsible for chronic liver disease.

Sources:
sciencedaily.com
healthline.com
ehp.niehs.nih.gov
ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

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Good Mood Food!

We all know that food can affect our weight, skin, cardiovascular system and energy, but did you know it can significantly affect your mood and Sunshine Coast Integrated Wellness Clinicmind? There is always more that can be done in correcting your diet for mental stamina, calmness, clarity, motivation and happiness.

A diet centred around food for mood should include eating ideally grain free, increasing high nutrient value foods, significantly increasing the fats your brain loves and increasing fermented foods.

Neurotransmitters are made from a huge range of nutrient cofactors, but the most clinically significant nutrients that are often low are zinc, vitamin B6 and magnesium. These nutrients are all essential for the formation of serotonin, dopamine and GABA. A naturally colourful, diversified vegetable loaded diet with a good level of proteins will ensure these vitamins are available.

Why reduce the grains for a happy mind? Grains contain lectins, a known gut irritant, and phytic acid, which inhibits bioavailability of nutrients needed for neurotransmitter production. Grains are often heavily farmed, so often are nutrient poor. And most importantly they almost always take place of what should be vegetables thus reducing mood boosting nutrient intake.

The first questions I often get asked is “Will I get constipated if I reduce grains?” Yes you may, but that is not normal. If you are constipated it is probably because you have either not increased your vegetable intake enough, you have not drank enough water or your gut flora and/or enzyme activity is out of balance. In which case it is best to see a Practitioner as there are many physiological factors that need addressing as one diet does not fit every single person.

Fermented foods are becoming so popular and for good reasons. Kefir, sauerkraut, kombucha and kimchi are all superb examples of imputing good bacteria into your gut. Bacterias help with increasing your nutrient absorption, providing precursors for neurotransmitters, balancing inflammatory responses and digestion of your food. It is well documented that gut bacteria can indeed affect our mental state. The more of the good bacterias that are there the more in favour your microbiome is for a happy mental state.

Your brain is mostly made of fat so it is important to include plenty of good fats in your diet. Omega 3 fats fatty acids, naturally high in seafood, is a key nutrient in nerve function. Research shows us that omega 3’s can reduce significantly inflammation in the body, and inflammation has been implicated as a contributing factor of many psychological imbalances.

How you feed your gut, is how you are feeding your mind. Make your diet naturally colourful, eat foods that are not processed, eat plenty of vegetables, drink copious amounts of water, eat moderate protein & plenty of good fats.  The results can be transformational!

This article was written by Suzi Le Fanue and published in Holistic Bliss magazine April edition.

Phone 54584800 for your FREE Introductory Consultation.

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Vitamin C found to reduce Depression

A study published in the Nutrition Journal done demonstrated that 1000mg Vitamin C used alongside fluoxetine (an antidepressant aka Prozac) reduced symptoms of depression. They suggest that this may be the result of the anti-oxidant properties of vitamin C (since there may be oxidative side effects from fluoxetine). Your brain loves Vitamin C. It was really interesting reading their discussion, they cite many papers that link vitamin C to a reduction in all sorts of psychological issues. Promising area of research. Vitamin C is one of my favourite vitamins. This is the sort of research I love!

I will also add that vitamin C is also needed for dopamine production. Dopamine is a neurotransmitter that is often forgotten about, it is vital for mental clarity and motivation. I like to explain dopamine as being the controller of the filing system in your brain. It ensures you are able to focus, absorb and store the right information.

Best sources of vitamin C: Kale (and pretty much all greens), Broccoli, Peppers, Berries.

www.nutritionj.com/content/pdf/1475-2891-12-31.pdf

 

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