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Anxiety or Depression a part of your life? Could Bacteria be the answer?

Can bacteria cause Anxiety or Depression? Suzi Le Fanue from Integrated Wellness Clinic reports the research.

We all know how bacteria can affect us when we are sick. But what about the seemingly harmless bacteria that colonise our gut every day?               Naturopath Suzi Le Fanue Reports.

Are you finding yourself frustrated, thinking negatively, unmotivated and overwhelmed? Are you tired of taking medication that is not offering you the relief you would like?  Have you ever wondered why all this happens? Could Bacteria be the answer?

Are you anxious when you wake up, find it hard to fall asleep, tired all the time and irritable?

There is always a cause.

A survey of 8,841 people aged 16 to 85 was conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and they found that a staggering 7.3 million (45%) of the respondents reported a lifetime mental disorder. You have to wonder, why this is becoming more frequent?

Research shows us some promising answers. Often part of the problem is not in the brain, it is further south… your digestive system to be exact. After all, for years Scientist’s have been called it your “second brain”.

The digestive system is like the roots of a tree; it absorbs your nutrients and helps you to flourish. But what if you carried a pathogenic infection that released neuro-toxins, affecting the way your brain works and at the same time robbed you of your nutrients?

Researchers at McMaster University have supportive evidence that bacteria residing in the gut influence brain chemistry and behaviour. When there was a change in the gut flora of the test subject’s increased anxiety and behaviour change was noted. For years these bacteria’s have been seen to be harmless, but the negative impact of specific strains of bacteria on the brain are documented.

The pathogenic bacteria have the potential to cause havoc on your digestive system and indirectly can cause Serotonin to drop. Serotonin is your happy, chirpy, relaxing neurotransmitter. Not many people are aware that it is predominantly made in the gut. So viewing depression or anxiety as a one organ “disease” is clearly not the only way it should be treated.

The expressions “gut wrenching” and “butterflies in my belly” are used for a reason, and we have all experienced them. So we know there is a connection between the gut and brain.

Most research around the connection of the gut to brain has been focused on early childhood mental health such as autism, with only recently emerging studies on adult onset mental health conditions. It is exciting to see the medical world of research extend beyond just looking at one organ. Let’s hope this area of research continues to grow.

Written by Suzi Le Fanue

Integrated Wellness Clinic

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